theme

dark-haired-hamlet:

when somebody you don’t like asks you to do something

image

ofbard:

OH MY GOD

Anne Carson, “The Gender of Sound” (excerpt)

bellebissett:

image

Madness and witchery as well as bestiality are conditions commonly associated with the use of the female voice in public, in ancient as well as modern contexts. Consider how many female celebrities of classical mythology, literature and cult make themselves objectionable by the way they use their voice.

For example, there is the heart-chilling groan of the Gorgon, whose name is derived from a Sanskrit word, *garg meaning “a guttural animal howl that issues as a great wind from the back of the throat through a hugely distended mouth”. There are the Furies whose high-pitched and horrendous voices are compared by Aiskhylos to howling dogs or sounds of people being tortured in hell (Eumenides). There is the deadly voice of the Sirens and the dangerous ventriloquism of Helen (Odyssey) and the incredible babbling of Kassandra (Aiskhylos, Agamemnon) and the fearsome hullabaloo of Artemis as she charges through the woods (Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite). There is the seductive discourse of Aphrodite which is so concrete an aspect of her power that she can wear it on her belt as a physical object or lend it to other women (Iliad). There is the old woman of Eleusinian legend Iambe who shrieks obscenities and throws her skirt up over her head to expose her genitalia. There is the haunting garrulity of the nymph Echo (daughter of Iambe in Athenian legend) who is described by Sophokles as “the girl with no door on her mouth” (Philoktetes).

Putting a door on the female mouth has been an important project of patriarchal culture from antiquity to the present day. Its chief tactic is an ideological association of female sound with monstrosity, disorder and death.

– From “The Gender of Sound”, in Glass, Irony and God. New Directions, 1995: pp 120-121
The essay: http://soundspill.org/ongoing/Carson.pdf

Art: Cassandra by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

twentydollarnose-bleed:

Les Misérables? I love that book. I love the way that all the people become [clenches fist] less fricking miserable.

mcspookyville:

NMTD + text posts

Well, I have said this in the past, so I hope i don’t bore you by repeating it, but I think that we live or die under the tyranny of perfection. Socially, we are pushed towards being perfect. Physically, beautiful to conform to standards that are cruel and uncommon, to behave and lead our lives in a certain way, to demonstrate to the world that we are happy and healthy and all full of sunshine. We are told to always smile and never sweat, by multiple commercials of shampoo or beer.

And I feel that the most achievable goal of our lives is to have the freedom that imperfection gives us.

And there is no better patron saint of imperfection than a monster.

We will try really hard to be angels, but I think that a balanced, sane life is to accept the monstrosity in ourselves and others as part of what being human is. Imperfection, the acceptance of imperfection, leads to tolerance and liberates us from social models that I find horrible and oppressive.

—   Guillermo del Toro, on why he has always been intrigued by monsters [x] (via radiophile)   —

bohim:

Then I decide to be quiet instead of explaining what I actually wanted to say.

Hamlet: You read my journal?
Horatio: At first I did not know it was your diary. I thought it was a very sad handwritten book.

fakeituntilyoumakeitphff:

spoken-not-written:

oopsphan:

darlinghogwarts:

In the books, Hermione’s boggart is failing her classes. Her greatest fear is failing her classes.

However, it goes a lot deeper than that. Subconsciously, I think she believes that if she does not do well and if she fails, they’ll kick her out of Hogwarts and the Wizarding World. So her real fear isn’t failing.

At Hogwarts, she has two wonderful friends who love her, and she is getting to live in an incredible world. She doesn’t want to lose that, and she thinks that if she does bad in her classes, they won’t let her come back.

Her real fear is rejection and loss.

so what if…

when in the philosophers stone her line “we could be killed, or worse.. expelled” wasn’t her being snooty or a teachers pet..

but her saying that she would rather die than stop going to hogwarts and never see her friends again?

why

image

babyferaligator:

unsuccessfulmetalbenders:

tellthemwhoiwillbe:

While you wait for the waiter, 

in that moment

do you not become the waiter

this website goes from saying the sound a car makes is nyoom to deep philosophical questions so fast it gives me whiplash 

nyoom

sad-girl-stuff:

So who is going to start a book club with me??

flavorpill:

50 Best Films About Writers, Ranked

People always make Juliet out to be dumb in Romeo and Juliet, but I think she at least had some sense where Romeo didn't have much of any

Romeo: I was thinking about this chick earlier who I said I was in love with but now I love that girl over there that is very likely to either belong to my family's enemy or be close with my family's enemy as it is their party I am crashing
Juliet: I do not like being so young and forced into a relationship with an older man, but oh there's a cute guy more my age over there. And since he's here he must have been invited and is there for a reasonable love match for myself
--
Romeo: We should kiss right now at this party
Juliet: No that is a super dumb idea
Romeo: *kisses her anyway*
Juliet: That was dumb of you
--
Romeo: We should get married right now
Juliet: We don't know each other. Shouldn't we wait until at least a little time has passed?
Romeo: Like tomorrow?
Juliet: Sure, fine.
--
Juliet: We're married now, so we have to try and make things better between our families.
Romeo: Right.
Romeo: It seems I have killed your cousin and am now exiled.
--
Juliet: Ok so since Romeo fucked up I'm gonna fix this shit by taking a harmless sleeping liquid. He'll come and get me and we can go away together.
Romeo: *immediately kills himself*
Juliet: For fucks sake.

Leonid Gore